Adverse Life Events

Stress

Adjustment Disorder

Bereavement

Job Loss

Separations

Other Losses

 

 

Stress

Stress occurs when there are one or a number of adverse events that are perceived to be beyond a person's ability to cope.  It can cause both physical and psychological symptoms.  Stress can be caused by problems of health, work, relationships, families or any events or experiences that are seen to be too difficult to manage or endure.  Pressure in itself is not a bad thing and, in fact, many people thrive on it.  However, when these pressures exceed a person's perceived ability to cope, then that is when feelings of stress can develop.  Stress can be tackled either by reducing pressures or by increasing coping resources - or a combination of the two.
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Adjustment Disorder

An Adjustment Disorder occurs when there is an abnormal reaction to one or more stressful life experiences.  The person has found it more difficult to adapt to the event that would be normally expected.  This could take the form of anxiety, worry, feelings of sadness and tearfulness, broken sleep, difficulty in concentrating, muscle tension and fatigue.  A person suffering in this way might also withdraw socially, have difficulty working and lose interest in activities.  Typical stressors could include the death of a loved one or pet, changes in health, loss of a job or relationship, or an unexpected misfortune.  Counselling and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy can be very effective in helping people adapt to difficult life events.
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Bereavement

Losing a loved one can be one of the most sad and painful experiences in life.  Grieving and being able to move on can be difficult.  Death may trigger unresolved losses or issues from the past, as well as uncertainty about the future.  Grief can evoke a whole range of emotions including hopelessness, anger, and despair.  There is no 'normal' grief reaction and it is a normal life experience.  Being with friends and family usually is enough to provide the help and support that is needed.  However, if it is felt that there is difficulty in coming to terms with the death, for instance where there are unresolved feelings, or the grief reaction is lasting much longer than expected, then therapy can be helpful.
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