Personal Development

Low Self-Esteem

Assertiveness

Social Skills

 

Low Self-Esteem

Self-esteem refers to someone's evaluation or opinion of themselves and also how they perceive others see them.  Low self-esteem is relatively common and can lead to a range of psychological problems such as depression or anxiety.  The fear that a person is 'not good enough' can undermine their ability to form and maintain intimate relationships, perform at work, and enjoy social situations.  These thoughts may have begun at a young age and dominate a person's thinking particularly when considering social situations.  A treatment approach such as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy or Schema-Focused Therapy takes the view that negative core beliefs about the self are maintained by unhelpful thinking or behaviours.  Low self-esteem can be overcome by using a set of strategies to introduce more helpful ways of thinking and changes in behaviour.
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Assertiveness

Lack of assertiveness can affect relationships and quality of life.  People who lack assertiveness fail to communicate effectively and are poor at getting their needs met.  Family life, career prospects and relationships can all be affected by lack of assertiveness.  Having good assertiveness skills allows people to engage respectfully with other people, whilst also respecting their own needs.  It ensures that they do not feel taken advantage of and can say no without feeling guilty.  When someone is unable to express themselves assertively, they tend to resort to passive modes of communication such as using sarcasm, being resentful, or being passive aggressive.  Assertiveness involves clear, calm communication and respectful negotiation within a space where each person's opinion is heard.  Therapy can be used to teach assertiveness and other social skills to increase confidence and engagement with others.
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Social Skills

Social skills are seen as a range of abilities in interacting, socializing and communicating with others.  They include both verbal and non-verbal forms of communication and vary across cultures.  Social skills are about being able to say or do the right thing at the right time in the right place.  There are unwritten and implicit rules and social skills are generally learnt throughout childhood.  However this learning continues throughout life as people move through different ages and life experiences.  However, some people for whatever reason may not have picked up good social skills, but it is possible to develop these in later life.  This can significantly improve social and personal functioning and generally improve well-being.
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